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A forest is much more than the timber it holds. A forest provides habitat for wildlife, recreational opportunities and removes carbon dioxide from the air, therefore forests are a critical "hedge" against global warming.
When we take into account all the ecological benefits, or services, a forest provides, we have to re-evaluate the way the way we make decisions about how we manage them.
Clear-cutting an old-growth forest may provide temporary jobs and profits, as well as wood to build furniture and houses, but it also results in the release of carbon stored in the trees and soil, thus contributing to global warming, or if it wipes out the habitat of animals that is crucial to the natural order, then the short-term gains may not be worthwile.
All this does not mean that we should stop logging, it just means finding better ways to manage all our activities in the ecosystems-and it means putting a value on the very real services they provide. If we don't address the serious problems of global warming and biodiversity loss, as well as issues such as access to clean air and water, we may well join the other endangered species on the Earth.


From an article by David Suzuki
and Dr. Faisal Moola.

Last edited {1}
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Thank you Vicky, I agree with you.



I made an earlier post about saving the trees:

Forests harbor much of the world's biodiversity. They soak up water and seed rainclouds; they inhale carbon dioxide; they exhale oxygen for us to breathe. They are essential to life, but sadly, despite the growing consciousness about the importance of forests, we continue to lose around 13-million hectares per year.

This is a very big amount and ultimately will cause a lot of damage to our world.

Last edited by Inda
Thank you for the post Vicky.

Let us hope that humans will become serious about the ecosystem of the earth and the damage we are doing.

Trees are of continued importance to the environment. Tropical rain forests have of particular significance; although they now occupy less than 6 per cent of the land surface of the earth they probable sustain more than half of the biological species on the planet.


Last edited by Sue 1
I read in "The Globe and Mail" newspaper today that there are black clouds on the horizon for birds of the world. Some of the most common species of birds are declining.
Among the threats to bird populations are the replacing of natural forests with plantations of only one or two tree species, the biofuel mania that is leading to forests being converted for palm-oil production, logging, industrial agriculture and fishing, and the spread of invasive predators such as rats...

Last edited by Sue 1


Birds have evolved to thrive in some of the world's most forbidding environments, but they're facing a hige challenge coping with humans. One in eight species around the world is at risk of extinction, with habitat loss and degradation the main reason. In North America, many common species have experienced population declines of 50 per cent since the 1960's.

From: The Globe and Mail,
Tuesday, September 23, 2008

Last edited by Inda
The plants in a woodland will all host a variety of animal life. Oak trees alone, will support an amazing 400+ different invertebrate species, although not of course, necessarily all on one tree!
.
A tree's value for animal life does not end with the death of the tree. Even such a seemingly mundane habitat as rotting wood, hosts about 1,700 different kinds of invertebrates in Britain.


Fungi and bacteria are an often overlooked component of woodlands. They are vital for recycling dead material into reusable nutrients to fuel new plant growth.

http://www.countrysideinfo.co.uk/woodland_manage/intro.htm

Managing Woodlands for Biodiversity

Animal diversity is to a great degree controlled by plant diversity. This is because the plants generally provide the architecture and structure of a habitat, as well as being the basis of food chains.

Plant diversity in woodlands can be encouraged by making sure there are a variety of light levels within a woodland from deep shade to open glades. Planting a variety of native trees will also enhance animal diversity because native trees support many more invertebrate species.

Last edited by Vicky2
quote:
Originally posted by dear Sue 1:
Thank you for the post Vicky.

Let us hope that humans will become serious about the ecosystem of the earth and the damage we are doing.
Amen and Awomen!


Treeappeal.com


Some great woodlands stuff in TreeAppeal, and here, thanks all! Wave2 Hug Angel

Love and LIGHT BEING, Teom Rudolph

Have the heart of a gypsy, and the dedication of a soldier -Beethoven in Beethoven Lives Upstairs

Thank you for this very important topic.

Trees benefit us not only our physical environment, but also attract birds and other wildlife, making our urban centers a more pleasant place to live. Picture the eerie silence that would befall a city were the song of birds entirely absent.



Love,
yoko
Last edited by yoko
When the last Red Man and Woman have vanished with their wilderness, and their memory is only the shadow of a cloud moving across the prairie, will the shores and the forests still be here? Will there be any of the spirit of my people left?
My ancestors said to me, This we know:
The earth does not belong to us. We belong to the earth.
~Chief Seattle

Last edited by Sue 1
There are plans to chop down a large section of these trees in the rainforests of Brazil. Below are some reasons why people might be against this happening.

• People live in the rainforests and they may lose their homes and their way of life if trees around them are cut down. Being re-homed in a city wouldn’t be the same.
• Many different plants and animals exist only in rainforests, and if they no longer have a place to live their species is at risk of becoming extinct.
• 20% of the Oxygen we breathe in produced in the Amazon rainforest, and we need this Oxygen to survive.
• Many plants used in medicines have been found in rainforests. If we destroy the rainforests we could destroy life-saving medicines.
• There are other things which people can use for light and heat without having to burn wood on a fire. Electricity doesn’t fun out but trees might!

From: [url=http://www.primaryresources.co.uk/geography/docs/cutting_down_rainforests.doc]http://www.primaryresources.co...down_rainforests.doc[/ur



Last edited by Inda
We need to keep the forest healthy and productive,
while at the same time providing diverse habitat
for a variety of wildlife. Depending upon your goals, success
can be measured by the diversity of benefits your
woodlands provide, in terms of wood products, wildlife,
recreational opportunities and personal enjoyment.

Last edited by Vicky2

All this does not mean that we should stop logging, it just means finding better ways to manage all our activities in the ecosystems-and it means putting a value on the very real services they provide. If we don't address the serious problems of global warming and biodiversity loss, as well as issues such as access to clean air and water, we may well join the other endangered species on the Earth.

Thank you Vicky for the nice post.

Last edited by Inda

A forest is much more than the timber it holds. A forest provides habitat for wildlife, recreational opportunities and removes carbon dioxide from the air, therefore forests are a critical "hedge" against global warming.
When we take into account all the ecological benefits, or services, a forest provides, we have to re-evaluate the way the way we make decisions about how we manage them.
Clear-cutting an old-growth forest may provide temporary jobs and profits, as well as wood to build furniture and houses, but it also results in the release of carbon stored in the trees and soil, thus contributing to global warming, or if it wipes out the habitat of animals that is crucial to the natural order, then the short-term gains may not be worthwile.
All this does not mean that we should stop logging, it just means finding better ways to manage all our activities in the ecosystems-and it means putting a value on the very real services they provide. If we don't address the serious problems of global warming and biodiversity loss, as well as issues such as access to clean air and water, we may well join the other endangered species on the Earth.


From an article by David Suzuki
and Dr. Faisal Moola.

Thank you Vicky for this original post.

Last edited by yoko

1) Trees are the basis of sustaining life on earth. 2) Trees absorb carbon dioxide and release oxygen by Photosynthesis. 3) They also help in reducing soil erosion by binding the soil to their roots. 4) Trees absorb carbon from the atmosphere and store it in their wood and bark, thus slowing the rate of global warming.

https://www.google.com/search?...TUY6dzxVP42odO3TRG-F

Last edited by Inda

I agree, we need to plant many more trees.

Trees have medicinal uses: 1 of 4 pharmaceutical products is plant-based. Some examples include extracts from the yew trees (Taxusspp.) used in chemotherapy drugs (“Taxol”), aspirin and creams

Trees provide food for people and animals (fruit, berries, and nuts)

Trees make the air more breathable by reducing particulate matter (What Trees Can Do to Reduce Atmospheric CO2 PDF)

By planting trees and shrubs, you can reduce noise pollution

Tree-lined streets increase traffic safety by making streets appear narrower 

Trees capture carbon and become carbon ‘sinks’ which reduce the Greenhouse Effect

 

Trees’ root systems help prevent soil erosion, which prevents water pollution 

Trees provide shade that cools water, benefitting certain species of fish (notably salmonids) – their roots and branches provide space for fish to hide from predators

Properties with trees are generally valued higher in the real estate market

Trees provide employment in the forestry field: foresters, arborists, lumber, research, tree workers, etc.

Trees provide recreation and attract tourists: hiking trails, campgrounds 

Trees provide shade in the summer, which saves on air conditioning costs, conifers insulate homes in the winter, reducing heating costs 

Trees shade asphalt, making streets and parking lots cooler and extend the life of the asphalt

 

Trees planted in fields shield against wind and snow and help protect crops

Trees beautify the landscape and block out unattractive views

Trees provide shelter for wildlife 

Trees provide health benefits such as stress reduction and speed the healing process

Trees bring us closer to nature and help us to reconnect with culture

Studies show that hospital patients with window view of trees recovered significantly faster and with fewer complications than comparable patients without access to such views.

Trees intercept rainfall and reduce run-off, thereby functioning like retention/detention basins.

 

The psychological impact of trees on people’s moods, emotions and enjoyment of their surroundings may in fact be one of the greatest benefits urban forests provide.

One large tree can provide a day’s oxygen for up to four people.

You need about 500 full-sized trees to absorb the carbon dioxide produced by a typical car driven 20,000 km/year.

One large tree can lift up to 100 gallons of water out of the ground and discharge it into the air in one day.

https://treecanada.ca/resources/benefits-of-trees/

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