Thus, to give just a few very brief and general examples, the aim of psychoanalysis and most forms of conventional psychotherapy is to heal the radical split between the conscious and unconscious aspects of the psyche so that a person is put in touch with all of his mind. These therapies aim at reuniting the persona and shadow so as to create a strong and healthy ego, which is to say, an accurate and acceptable self- image. In other words, they are all oriented toward the ego level. They seek to help an individual living as persona to re-map the self as ego.

Beyond this, however, the aim of most so-called humanistic therapies is to heal the split between the ego itself and the body, to reunite the psyche arid soma so as to reveal the total organism. This is why humanistic psychology called the Third Force (the other two major forces in psychology being psychoanalysis and behaviorism) is also referred to as the human potential movement. In extending the person’s identity from just the mind or ego to the entire organism-as-a-whole, the vast potentials of the total organism are liberated and put at the individual’s disposal.

Going deeper still, we find the aim of such disciplines as Zen Buddhism or Vedanta Hinduism is to heal the split between the total organism and the environment to reveal an identity, a supreme identity, with the entire universe. They are aiming, in other words, for the level of unity consciousness. But let us not forget that between the level of unity consciousness and the level of the total organism there are the transpersonal bands of the spectrum. The therapies addressing this level are deeply concerned with those processes in the person which are actually supra-individual, or collective, or transpersonal. Some of them even refer to a transpersonal self, and while this transpersonal self is not identical with the All (that would be unity consciousness), it nevertheless transcends the boundaries of the individual organism. Among the therapies aiming at this level are Psychosynthesis, Jungian analysis, various preliminary yoga practices, Transcendental Meditation techniques, and so on.

All of this is of course a very simplified version of things, hut it does point out the general fashion in which most of the malor schools of psychology, psychotherapy, and religion are simply addressing the different major levels of the spectrum. Some of these correspondences are shown in figure z, where the major schools of therapy are listed beside the level of the spectrum toward which they fundamentally aim. I should mention that because, like any spectrum, these levels shade into one another quite a bit, no absolutely distinct and separate classification of the levels or the therapies addressing those levels is possible. Further, when I classify a therapy on the basis of the level of the spectrum it addresses, that means the deepest level which that therapy recognizes, either explicitly or implicitly. Generally speaking, you will find that a therapy of any given level will recognize and accept the potential existence of all of the levels above its own, but deny the existence of all those beneath it.

As a person (layperson or therapist) gains familiarity with the spectrum its various levels with their different potentials and different problems she will be better able to orient herself (or her client) in the journey for self-understanding and self-growth. She may he able to recognize more readily from which levels the present problems or conflicts stem, and thus apply to any given conflict the appropriate therapeutic process for that level. She may also come to recognize which potentials and levels she wishes to contact, as well as the procedures best suited to facilitate this growth.

Growth fundamentally means an enlarging and expanding of one’s horizons, a growth of one’s boundaries, outwardly in perspective and inwardly in depth. But that is precisely the definition of descending the spectrum. (Or ascending it, depending upon which angle you prefer. I will in this book use descending simply because it better matches fig. i.) When a person descends a level of the spectrum he has in effect remapped his soul to enlarge its territory. Growth is reapportionment; re-zoning; re-mapping; an acknowledgement, and then enrichment, of ever deeper and more encompassing levels of one’s own self.
page 12-13, images page 14



Image files:
http://Inersha.com/images/NoBoundaryt.jpg http://Inersha.com/images/NoBoundary.jpg http://Inersha.com/images/NoBoundary.pdf

---------------

Boy it is fun, being all one! he he..

May this help us come together more and more.

Lovebeams, Teo Wink

May you find yourself in the world, and may you enjoy the company.
Original Post
Thank you Teo,

Now you made me interrupt my reading,
to catch a fragment of the reader!
I am also beginning wonder which of my
I's I really am???

Boy, it is such fun being one!!

quote:
Originally posted by Teo:
Boy it is fun, being all one! he he..

May this help us come together more and more.



Smile Smile Frown Big Grin Big Grin Big Grin Wink Razz Razz Razz Cool Cool Roll Eyes Roll Eyes Mad Eek Eek Cool Razz Big Grin Smile
Last edited {1}
Dear Teo,
I had to stop watching the reader and go back to being the reader.
All I see is that when you reach the deepest level of the Self there are no territories or boundaries, there is only infinity.

Smile Smile Eek Roll Eyes Smile Razz Razz Razz Cool Cool Cool Razz Razz Razz Eek Eek Roll Eyes Big Grin Big Grin Wink
This is a very fascinating subject.
I will pick up the book.

Thank you,
Gisele
Dear Teo,

I just started the book, and as I see it, there are no real levels or boundaries. That is just an illusion. What we think obstructs us from unity consciousness does not really exist.
Ken Wilber states that if we look for the 'self' we will not find it. The feeling of being an isolated self, on whatever level, is an obstacle to unity consciousness.

Words of the great Buddhist Padmasambhava:
"If the seeker himself, when sought, cannot be found, thereupon is attained the goal of seeking, and also the end of the search itself."

I am only into chapter four, but I cannot see how there can be actual, real levels if there
is no real 'self?'

Confused Confused Confused Frown Red Face Razz Razz Eek Roll Eyes Cool Cool Cool Eek Eek Roll Eyes Frown Red Face Razz Razz Confused Confused Confused
Thank you Teo.
I missed this very interesting post.

Love,
Vicky 2Hearts

quote:
Growth fundamentally means an enlarging and expanding of one’s horizons, a growth of one’s boundaries, outwardly in perspective and inwardly in depth. But that is precisely the definition of descending the spectrum. (Or ascending it, depending upon which angle you prefer. I will in this book use descending simply because it better matches fig. i.) When a person descends a level of the spectrum he has in effect remapped his soul to enlarge its territory. Growth is reapportionment; re-zoning; re-mapping; an acknowledgement, and then enrichment, of ever deeper and more encompassing levels of one’s own self.
page 12-13, images page 14
I missed this post as well.
Thanks Teo, and thanks Vicky for going through the old posts.

Sue Cat Cat

quote:
Going deeper still, we find the aim of such disciplines as Zen Buddhism or Vedanta Hinduism is to heal the split between the total organism and the environment to reveal an identity, a supreme identity, with the entire universe.

Add Reply

Post
Content may be subject to copyright. See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fair_use
"..for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, or research.."

If you wish to contact us or join, Please go to our E-Learning site and fill out the contact us form!

Follow Givnology on Twitter

books
Submit Site - Web Site Promotion Submit Your Site To The Web's Top 50 Search Engines for Free! Search Engine Submission and Internet Marketing Search Engine Submission & Optimization
Submitshop LAUNCH FREE and FAST Search Engine SubmissionLiving Well Blogs - Blog Catalog Blog Directory

Google
WWW Givnology

×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×